Published date: 28 April 2021

General

Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) advisory circulars (ACs) contain information about standards, practices and procedures that the Director has found to be an Acceptable Means of Compliance (AMC) with the associated rule.

An AMC is not intended to be the only means of compliance with a rule, and consideration will be given to other methods of compliance that may be presented to the Director. When new standards, practices, or procedures are found to be acceptable they will be added to the appropriate AC.

Purpose

This AC provides methods acceptable to the Director for organisations to show compliance with the certification requirements of Part 175 to provide aeronautical information services for the New Zealand air navigation system, on behalf of the Authority.

Related Rules

This AC relates specifically to CAR Part 175- Aeronautical Information Services Organisations—Subpart B – Certification requirements.

Change Notice

Revision 3 makes stylistic changes and updates information in Appendix 3 of this AC to better reflect Civil Aviation Rule Part 175 and ICAO Annex 15 requirements.


Subpart A — General

New Zealand, as a contracting State to the Chicago Convention on International Civil Aviation, is required under ICAO Annex 15 to—

(a) provide an Aeronautical Information Service (AIS); or

(b) agree with one or more Contracting State(s) for the provision of a joint service; or

(c) delegate the authority for the provision of the service to a non-government agency, provided the Standards and Recommended Practices of Annex 15 are adequately met.

Annex 15 Aeronautical Information Services is the base document to establish the requirements and standards prescribed in Part 175.

ICAO Doc 8126 Aeronautical Information Services Manual provides guidance information that will be referenced in this AC.

ICAO Annex 4 Aeronautical Charts and ICAO Doc 8697 Aeronautical Chart Manual provide guidance information relevant to the AIP Service.

Part 175 prescribes rules governing the certification and operation of organisations providing an AIS for New Zealand on behalf of the Authority. Part 175 also prescribes the requirements for the aeronautical information that is published by an AIS organisation.

The object of an aeronautical information service is to ensure the flow of information that is necessary for the safety, regularity and efficiency of air navigation.

Subpart B — Certification Requirements

175.51(a)(1) Personnel Requirements (Chief Executive)

Each applicant for an Aeronautical Information Service Certificate is required to nominate a person to be identified as the Chief Executive. This person must have the overall authority within the organisation, including financial authority, to ensure that the necessary resources, including facilities, are available to provide the AISs listed in their exposition. The Chief Executive must ensure that the organisation’s activities with respect to the AIS are carried out in accordance with the procedures contained in their exposition.

175.51(a)(2) Personnel Requirements (Senior Persons)

The senior person or persons nominated in the exposition represent the management structure of the AIS organisation. They should be suitably qualified and experienced for the position held and must be ultimately responsible for the quality of the aeronautical information published by the organisation.

Titles and responsibilities of the nominated senior persons will vary from organisation to organisation depending on the services provided. Responsibil­ities may be subdivided under individuals or combined in any number of ways.

Irrespective of the titles used or the number of senior persons nominated, the following areas are expected to be addressed where they are applicable to the services provided—

Collection of Information

· Responsibility for collecting and collating information from the various originators of aeronautical information and ensuring that the requirements of rule 175.59 are met.

Publication of Information

· Responsibility for checking, coordinating, editing, publishing and distributing the aeronautical information and ensuring that the requirements of rule 175.61 are met.

Internal Quality Assurance

· Responsibility for the organisation’s internal quality assurance procedures.

· Responsibility for monitoring the organisation’s compliance with its exposition and with Part 175.

· Responsibility for ensuring that the organisation’s exposition and associated procedures continue to meet the requirements specified in Part 175 and continue to reflect the organisation’s activities.

· Responsibility for ensuring the implementation of actions to correct deficiencies, in the organisation’s documentation and procedures, that are detected during internal quality assurance reviews, or CAA audits and inspections of the organisation.

· Responsibility for ensuring that the organisation complies with conditions attached to the organisation’s certificate or to an exemption.

The person who assumes these responsibilities on quality assurance must have direct access to the Chief Executive on the matters that affect the quality of the published information.

175.51(a) Personnel Requirements — General

All persons exercising privileges under the authority of an Aeronautical Information Service Certificate are required, under section 9 of the Civil Aviation Act 1990, to meet the criteria in section 10 of the Act in respect of being a fit and proper person.

Each of these nominated senior persons, including the Chief Executive, must be acceptable to the Director. To be accepted nominated persons must provide details on form CAA24FPP and other required information supplied with the application. They should also have adequate knowledge and experience relative to their position and responsibilities which is assessed in a senior person interview.

175.51(a)(3) Personnel Requirements

Appropriately qualified and experienced personnel in sufficient number are prerequisites for an AIS organisation to provide safe and expeditious aeronautical information and to deal with requests for information to and from other States.

An AIS organisation must therefore be technically oriented in the nature of the services provided. The aim must be to promote the correct level of technical proficiency within the organisation and to accord the AIS the appropriate status within the civil aviation system.

An AIS organisation may engage a third party to carry out activities associated with the service authorised under their AIS certificate. In these cases, the AIS organisation remains responsible for ensuring that the activities carried out by the third party are in conformance with the organisation’s exposition. The AIS organisation must establish a formal agreement (contract, letter of agreement etc) with the third party to ensure that the documented procedures are followed and the required performance is achieved.

175.51(b) Personnel Requirements (Competency Assessment)

A certificated AIS organisation is required to have procedures for assessing the competency of personnel who are authorised by the organisation to check, edit and publish aeronautical information. These procedures should include the levels of training, qualification, and experience that is necessary to ensure the safe and expeditious publication of that information.

Personnel responsible for collecting, collating, checking, coordinating and editing the information published by the AIP Service organisation must have a thorough understanding of the content, standards, format, and user requirements of the aeronautical information publications.

Personnel responsible for the operation of the NOTAM office must be—

· competent in the operation of the AFTN; and

· conversant with the standard format, codes and abbreviations for NOTAM; and

· conversant with the operational requirement for air traffic services, flight operations personnel, flight crews and the services responsible for pre-flight information to be kept informed of operationally significant information that may affect the safety of air navigation.

Personnel responsible for providing pre-flight information services must be conversant with the operational requirements of operations personnel and flight crews operating from the aerodromes and on the air routes originating from those aerodromes within the coverage area of the pre-flight information service. The certificated organisation needs to ensure the availability of pre-flight information essential for the safety, regularity and efficiency of air navigation relating to the routes originating at the aerodromes listed in their exposition.

Personnel who are responsible for checking, coordinating and editing aeronautical information should have an extensive pilot or air traffic service background or have had extensive specialist training in AIS. They should also have a thorough understanding of aerodrome operations and data.

ICAO provides training courses for AIS personnel from time to time.

On the job competency checks should be carried out at regular intervals with appropriate continuation training to maintain the competence level of those persons authorised by the organisation to check, edit and publish aeronautical information. Continuation training should include instruction on changes in regulatory requirements and standards, and changes to the organisation’s procedures and exposition.

Job descriptions must be formulated for all positions within the certificated organisation. The job descriptions for all personnel who carry out activities that can affect the safe and expeditious provision of aeronautical information should define their responsibilities, authority and their interrelation­ships. This is particularly important for personnel who—

· initiate action to prevent unsafe situations developing;

· identify and record problems that may affect safety;

· initiate, recommend or provide solutions through designated channels;

· verify the implementation of solutions; and

· control further activities following the detection of unsafe situations until deficiencies have been corrected.

The written documentation provided to each person who is authorised to edit and publish aeronautical information should be in a style that clearly identifies the types of information that the authorisation covers.

175.53 Facility Requirements

Rule 175.103(b)(1) requires the AIP Service organisation to designate an office as New Zealand’s point of contact with the aeronautical information services of other States. This point of contact is for the interchange of all elements of the integrated aeronautical information package except NOTAM.

Rule 175.105(1) requires the NOTAM Service organisation to designate an office as the International NOTAM Office (NOF) for New Zealand. Rule 175.105(4) also specifies requirements for telecommunication capabilities for the NOF.

AIS organisations should refer to the relevant chapters in ICAO Document 8126 for further guidance information on facilities and equipment for aeronautical information services.

To improve the efficiency, accuracy and cost effectiveness of aeronautical information services, many AIS organisations are moving toward automated AIS systems. The organisations need to ensure that any automation of their systems and services is designed with the intent of avoiding incompatibilities, divergences and unnecessary duplication of effort. The standardisation of procedures, products and services is essential for the successful automation of national and regional aeronautical information services.

ICAO Document 8126 provides guidance material for automation in the provision of aeronautical information services. AIS organisations should also be aware that future ICAO standards and recommended practices for AISs are likely to require greater automation in the provision of aeronautical information.

175.55 Scope of Pre-flight Information Service

Each applicant for the grant of an Aeronautical Information Service Certificate for a Pre-flight Information Service is required to specify–

· the geographic area; and

· the aerodromes and the air routes originating from those aerodromes–

for which the pre-flight information service is to be provided.

Pre-flight information is required by all aircraft operators. A briefing service may also be required by those operators who have not made specific arrangements to obtain pre-flight information. Briefing services should be arranged to supplement an operator’s alternative arrangements where these arrangements do not fully meet the operator’s requirements for pre-flight information.

The geographic area, aerodromes and the air routes (coverage zone) covered by the pre-flight information service need to be determined and periodically reviewed as changes take place or are anticipated in the air traffic pattern. The coverage zone should be determined in consultation with the operators using the aerodromes.

Pre-flight information services established to provide pre-flight briefing at aerodromes, particularly those used for international operations, should be organised and administered on the basis of the amount and type of traffic expected to use the aerodrome.  The length and number of the air routes originating from the aerodrome also need to be taken into consideration. With the long haul routes now operated by many of the international operators, the pre-flight information should cover the whole route and not just the first sector to the FIR boundary.

Further information on the scope and coverage of information provided by a pre-flight information service is given in Chapter 8 of ICAO Doc 8126, including information that may assist in determining the coverage zone for a pre-flight information service.

Details of the scope of the pre-flight information service provided by the organisation should also include, where applicable, the degree of centralisation, self-briefing and automation that is available to operators and flight crew. ICAO Doc 8126 provides further information on self briefing and use of automation for pre-flight information.

175.57 Documentation

The purpose of the aeronautical information service is to make available to aircraft operators, information that is necessary for the safety, regularity and efficiency of air navigation. Each applicant  is required, by rule 175.57(a)(1), to document the format and standards that they will follow in the publication of their aeronautical information. The format and standards must comply with the applicable requirements prescribed in Part 175 and should meet the applicable recommendations in this AC. The documented format and standards are required by rule 175.69(a)(9) to be included in the organisation’s exposition. Rule 175.109(d)(4) also requires the certificated organisation to notify the Director and obtain prior acceptance before any changes are made to the documented format and standards.

Aeronautical information is required to include regulatory requirements and procedures, aerodrome data and information, and the characteristics of facilities and services that are available for air navigation. To ensure that the information, and the AISs provided conform with relevant requirements, a certificated AIS organisation needs to hold copies of relevant reference material, standards, practices and procedures and any other documents that are necessary for the provision of their services. ICAO Doc 8126 provides a list of the ICAO and other documents that a certificated AIS organisation may need to hold.

The reference material, standards, practices and procedures and other documentation required under rule 175.57(a) must be controlled by appropriate procedures and these are required to be established by rule 175.57(b). When changes are made to any of the certificated organisation’s documentation, the relevant background information and reasons for the change should be documented and retained for possible audit purposes. This is particularly relevant to those documents generated by the organisation. Changes to documents must be reviewed and approved by the same functional positions or personnel who carried out the original review and approval unless specifically designated otherwise. Access to the background information is an important part of the review and approval process. Where practical, the nature of the change should be identified in the document or in appropriate attachments.

Documentation held on computer based systems is also acceptable, provided sufficient controls are established to maintain the integrity of the information held. Computer based systems must provide a level of traceability equivalent to that required for paper documents.

175.59 Collection of Information

To provide aeronautical information that is necessary for the safety, regularity and efficiency of air navigation, each AIS organisation requires the input of adequate, accurate and timely raw information. Such raw information has to be originated by organisations that provide services in support of the air navigation system.

To facilitate the input of raw information from these service organisations, the certificated AIS organisations need to establish and maintain a direct and continuous liaison with these information originators. The AIS organisations need to be proactive in obtaining the information they require for publication. This is particularly relevant to the AIP Service organisation because some of the information required to be published in the AIPNZ is originated by organisations that are not subject to Civil Aviation Rule requirements.

Originators of information who are required under the Civil Aviation Rules to provide information to the AIP Service and to the NOTAM Office for publication include—

· aerodrome operators certificated under CAR Part 139

· telecommunication service organisations certificated under CAR Part 171

· air traffic service organisations certificated under CAR Part 172

· meteorological service organisations certificated under CAR Part 174

· instrument flight procedure service organisations certificated under CAR Part 173

· AIS organisations certificated under CAR Part 175

Other organisations not subject to Civil Aviation Rule requirements who originate information for publication in the AIPNZ and by NOTAM include—

· CAA

· non-certificated aerodrome operators (subject to special requirements)

· Customs, Immigration, Health and Conservation Authorities

· Defence organisations

The AIS organisations are required to ensure that they have applicable input information from the AISs of other States.

The AIP Service organisation is required, under rule 175.103(b)(1), to establish an office as New Zealand’s point of contact with the AISs of other States. This is required for the international exchange of aeronautical information except NOTAM. The AIP Service organisation therefore needs to establish wherever practicable, facilities for direct contact with these overseas AISs.

The NOTAM Service organisation is required, under rule 175.105(3), to establish agreements with other international NOTAM offices for the exchange of NOTAM. These agreements can be in the form of a Letter of Agreement between the two NOTAM Offices. Although ICAO Annex 15 does not provide any guidance on the form of such agreements, ICAO Doc 9426 Air Traffic Services Planning Manual provides a sample Letter of Agreement between States and ATS facilities.

An AIS organisation’s procedures for collecting information therefore need to ensure that there are direct channels of communication for originators to submit raw data and information for publication. The AIS organisation must also make appropriate arrangements with information originators for the timely provision of the information. This is particularly relevant for the AIP Service because of the time required to edit, publish and distribute the printed information. Timely and close cooperation is therefore required between the AIP Service organisation and the originators to ensure that the originators are aware of the cut-off dates for publication. The originators can then plan their activities where possible to ensure that changes to the air navigation system are coordinated with the standard effective dates (AIRAC dates - Aeronautical Information Regulation and Control, established by ICAO and explained in more detail at 175.61(c)(1) AIRAC System, below) for published information.

The collection procedures must ensure that raw information is verified by the originator before the information is accepted for publication. The AIP Service and the NOTAM Service need to hold a register of persons designated by the information originators to be responsible for forwarding verified information to the AIS organisation for publication.

The NOTAM Service organisation’s procedures will also need to ensure that requests from originators for NOTAM to be issued do not require the NOTAM to be in effect for more than 3 months. If such requests are received, the NOTAM Office needs to advise the originator that the information must also be published in an AIP Amendment or an AIP Supplement. In these cases, the originator must forward appropriate information to the AIP Service organisation.

ICAO Doc 8126 provides further information on the liaison with other related services and with other States. ICAO Doc 8126 also provides further information on the collection of information.

Pre-flight information service organisations must ensure that they have appropriate sources of input information to provide pre-flight information for the aerodromes and air routes listed in their exposition.

ICAO Doc 8126 provides further guidance on the information requirements for pre-flight information services.

175.61 Publication of Aeronautical Information

Procedures are required for checking, coordinating, editing, publishing and disseminating aeronautical information applicable to the service being provided.

175.61(b)(1) . Although raw information must be verified by the originator before it is forwarded to the AIP Service or the NOTAM Service for publication, the AIP and the NOTAM Service organisations must check the received information. The check should be made against other available relevant information to ensure that there are no obvious errors or inconsistencies. Other available information includes previously published information such as the AIPNZ, the AIP of another State in the case of incoming international NOTAM, aerodrome plans and regulatory publications. For example, notification of a change to the operational length of a runway should be checked against the published physical characteristics of the runway, the location indicator and the runway designation to ensure that there is no obvious error in the data provided by the aerodrome operator.

ICAO Doc 8126 provides further guidance for accuracy checks particularly in relation to NOTAM.

175.61(b)(2) . The AIS organisation is responsible for editing the raw input information into the format that is required for publication of that information according to its operational significance. In editing the raw information, the AIS organisation must ensure that the intent and technical content of the information is not changed.

An essential element in an aeronautical information service is that the information must be accurately published. The procedures must therefore include sufficient checks in the editing and publishing processes to ensure that this accuracy requirement is met. Procedures may need to include a process for a printer’s proof copy to be checked by the information originator before final publication.

The aeronautical information must be distributed according to the operational significance of the information. Although the originator is responsible forwarding information in a timely manner to the appropriate AIS organisation, the receiving organisation needs to monitor the incoming information and check that the originator has taken all the necessary actions. Information of immediate operational significance must go to the NOTAM office for the issue of a NOTAM. Long-term temporary information and permanent information must go to the AIP Service. However, if the information has immediate operational significance, appropriate information must also be forwarded to the NOTAM office for the issue of a NOTAM.

ICAO Doc 8126 provides additional information on the dissemination of information and provides additional information on the distribution of publications.

175.61(b)(7) . NOTAM must include a date-time group for Item C in the standard NOTAM format. (Refer Annex 15) If the information on timing is uncertain, the approximate duration must be indicated using a date-time group followed by an EST (estimated). Any NOTAM that includes an EST must be cancelled or replaced and the NOTAM Service organisation’s procedures need to ensure that this action is taken.

AIP Supplements should not be used to promulgate temporary long-term information that will remain in effect for more than 12 months. If the information is to remain valid for a long period then consideration should be given to publishing it as an AIP Amendment.

175.61(b)(9) . New Zealand place names should be spelt according to the decisions of the New Zealand Geographic Board.

175.61(b)(12) . Annex 15 entitles the AIS of other States to receive, free of charge, at least one copy of each of the elements of the Integrated Aeronautical Information Package for New Zealand. The Authority is responsible for ensuring that the information is provided free of charge. Requests from other States, for copies of the AIPNZ and associated charts, should be directed to the CAA.

175.61(c)(1) AIRAC System. Information concerning changes in facilities, services or procedures often requires amendments to be made to airline operations manuals and other documents produced by other aviation agencies. The updating of these publications is usually carried out to prearranged production programmes.

Since many of the changes to facilities, services and procedures can be anticipated, it is highly desirable that the introduction of these changes, and hence the changes to the published aeronautical information, be controlled to a schedule of predetermined dates throughout the year.

ICAO has established the Aeronautical Information Regulation and Control (AIRAC) system for establishing, withdrawing or making significant changes to facilities, services and procedures in the air navigation system. The AIRAC system is based upon the international series of common effective dates at intervals of 28 days. ICAO Doc 8126 provides further information on the AIRAC system.

175.61(c)(6) Operationally significant information and Trigger NOTAM. Aeronautical Charts and operationally significant information published in AIP Amendments and AIP Supplements must be published in accordance with the AIRAC system. Under the AIRAC system, aircraft operators will receive notification of permanent, and long-term temporary changes to the air navigation system at least 28 days before the change comes into effect. Rule 175.61(c)(6) requires a NOTAM to be issued giving a brief description of the operationally significant contents, the effective date and the reference number of each AIRAC Amendment or Supplement. This NOTAM ( Trigger NOTAM) is intended as a reminder in the pre-flight information bulletin to alert aircraft operators to the fact that a significant change to the air navigation system has come into effect. The operators are therefore reminded to consult the relevant AIP Amendment or AIP Supplement. The NOTAM only needs to be originated when an Amendment or Supplement contains operationally significant information.

Operationally significant information is information that notifies the establishment, withdrawal of, and premeditated significant changes (including operational trials) to—

· limits (horizontal and vertical), regulations and procedures applicable to—

· flight information regions:

· control areas:

· control zones:

· advisory areas:

· ATS routes:

· permanent and long-term temporary danger and restricted areas (including type and periods of activity when known):

· permanent and long-term temporary areas or routes, or portions of them, where the possibility of interception exists;

· positions, frequencies, call signs, known irregularities and maintenance periods of radio navigation aids and communication facilities;

· holding and approach procedures, arrival and departure procedures, noise abatement procedures and any other pertinent ATS procedure;

· meteorological facilities including broadcasts and procedures;

· runways, stopways, taxiways and aprons;

· position, height and lighting of navigational obstacles;

· hours of service: aerodromes, facilities and services; and

· customs, immigration and health services.

175.63 Error Correction in Published Information

Procedures required under rule 175.63 are intended to apply to any error that is detected in the aeronautical information after it is published and distributed by a certificated AIS organisation. Potential sources for detecting such errors are the users of the published information and the organisation itself.

The cause of any error, which may be incorrect raw information from an originator or a defect in the organisation’s editing or publishing process, must be investigated and recorded for future audit purposes. The organisation would need to advise the Director if a particular originator of aeronautical information has a history of errors in the raw information they provide for publishing.

A certificated AIS organisation’s procedures must ensure that the error is corrected by the most appropriate means relative to the operational significance of the error. If the error is of direct operational significance, the organisation must originate a NOTAM to cancel the information and if necessary to notify the correct information.

The correction of any error in permanent or long-term temporary information must be by means of an AIP Amendment, an AIP Supplement or by reissue of the publication or chart. Replacement pages bearing the same effective date as the pages containing the error are not acceptable. NOTAM requesting hand amendments to publications or charts are also not acceptable.

Under rule 175.251(g), a replacement NOTAM that cancels the original NOTAM must be issued whenever an error occurs in a NOTAM. It is not acceptable for a service message to be issued to correct a NOTAM.

Any significantly incorrect, inadequate, or misleading information promulgated in any aeronautical information publication, including NOTAM, that affects or could affect the safety of aircraft operations is classified as a promulgated information incident. These incidents are required, under CAR Part 12 Reporting of Accidents and Incidents, to be reported to the Authority.

175.65 Records

Adequate and accurate records are an essential element in the safety of air navigation. Properly documented records provide the evidence that the prescribed procedures have been followed.

Records for the incoming and outgoing aeronautical information must provide the traceability that is required between incoming and outgoing information. Outgoing information must be traceable through serial number and date to—

· the relevant incoming information;

· the identity of the originator;

· the date that the incoming information was received; and

· the check procedures that were carried out before the information was published.

ICAO Doc 8126 provides further information on the recording and filing requirements for AIS.

Records for those personnel who are authorised by a certificated AIS organisation to check, edit and publish aeronautical information should include the following information—

· name;

· date of birth;

· position held within the organisation;

· relevant qualifications;

· relevant experience;

· specialised AIS training; and

· details of competency checks.

Records may be kept in any format but need to be controlled by a responsible senior person. Access to the record system needs to be controlled to ensure that the integrity of the records is maintained.

175.69 Organisation Exposition

The purpose of the Organisation Exposition is to document the procedures, means and methods of the organisation. Compliance with its contents will ensure compliance with Part 175, which is a prerequisite for obtaining and retaining an Aeronautical Information Service Certificate.

The Organisation Exposition is the means by which the organisation defines its operation.

Rule 175.69(a)(1) to (a)(6) provides the management part of the exposition and should normally be contained within one document. It should commence with the corporate commitment by the Chief Executive. The remaining parts of the exposition may be produced as any number of separate manuals. Any separate documents must be cross-referenced in the management part of the exposition and must be controlled by the procedures listed under rule 175.69(a)(11).

Senior persons should hold copies of those parts of the exposition or manuals that affect their areas of responsibility, and staff should be familiar with the parts of the exposition that affect their activities.

The following paragraphs address the individual requirements of the exposition—

(a)(1) . The statement by the Chief Executive required by rule 175.69(a)(1) is viewed by the Director as a Corporate commitment by the organisation. The statement should clearly address the goals and objectives of the organisation in respect of the AIS requirements prescribed by Part 175.

(a)(2) and (3). These are expanded in the comments made against rule 175.51 Personnel Requirements.

(a)(4) . The organisation needs to show the lines of responsibility and communication between the Chief Executive and the senior persons. The chart should show the functional relationship between locations where staff are permanently based and the central body of the organisation.

(a)(5) . The summary of staff employed by the organisation, and their location, provides the Director with an indication of the size of the organisation for assessing the application and establishing an audit programme.

(a)(6) . The organisation is to specify the aeronautical information services that the certificate is to cover.

(a)(7). A pre-flight information service organisation is to specify the aerodromes and the air routes originating from those aerodromes that the service is to cover.

(a)(8) . The AIP Service and the NOTAM Service organisations are to provide location and address details of the offices required in the relevant rules.

(a)(9) . Copies of the organisation’s format and standards documents relating to the aeronautical information that they publish should be included as part of the exposition. This is particularly relevant for the AIP Service as the AIPNZ and its associated amendments, supplements and charts and the aeronautical information circulars are State documents published by the AIP Service organisation.

(a)(10) . The procedures listed in this paragraph provide the working documents for controlling the organisation’s activities that can directly affect the adequacy, accuracy and timeliness of aeronautical information. The procedures may be contained in separate manuals and should provide a concise description of the means to control the standards, format, adequacy, accuracy and timeliness of the aeronautical information published by the organisation. The procedures may include references to other internal instructions and must include the internal quality assurance procedures which are an essential element of the quality management system.

(a)(11). These procedures must show how the organisation plans to control, amend and distribute its exposition. The procedures should be similar to those required under rule 175.57 for controlling, amending and distributing the organisation’s documentation.

(b) . The acceptance of the organisation’s exposition by the Director is the final step in the authorisation process for the provision of an aeronautical information service.

Subpart C — Operating Requirements

175.101 Continued Compliance

After obtaining an Aeronautical Information Service Certificate, it is the responsibility of the certificate holder to ensure that the organisation continues to meet the requirements for certification. The means of meeting these requirements are contained in the organisation’s exposition. Therefore a copy of the exposition, or at least each applicable part of it, must be available to all personnel who need access to the information to carry out their work. A complete copy of the exposition needs to be held at each major location covered by the exposition. Smaller satellite locations may, however, need only those parts that directly apply to their scope of activities.

175.103 AIP Service

(a) Publication of AIPNZ and AIC. The AIP Service organisation is required to publish the Aeronautical Publication New Zealand (AIPNZ) and Aeronautical Information Circulars (AIC). ICAO Doc 8126 provides guidance material on the preparation of original copy and reproduction of aeronautical information.

(a)(1) AIPNZ. By definition, the AIPNZ is the aeronautical information publication for New Zealand. It is required to contain aeronautical information of a lasting character essential to air navigation. The content of the AIPNZ is prescribed in Subpart D of Part 175. Further details of the contents of the AIPNZ are contained in Appendix 1 of this AC.

(a)(4) AIC . Aeronautical information circulars (AICs) are issued whenever it is necessary to promulgate aeronautical information which—

· does not qualify under the requirements of rule 175.151(a) for inclusion in the AIPNZ; or

· is not operationally significant to require the issue of a NOTAM.

The specifications for AICs are prescribed in Subpart E of Part 175. Further details of the type of information that should be promulgated by an AIC are contained in Appendix 2 to this AC.

(b)(1) Designated office . This rule reflects the requirement of Annex 15. This requires the State (CAA) to designate an office or offices to which all elements of the Integrated Aeronautical Information Package originated by other States should be addressed. The certificated organisation’s resources at the designated office need to be able to deal with requests from other States for information. The AIP Service organisation is not required to include resources for the international exchange of NOTAM.

(b)(2) Availability of information. Section 75(2) of the Civil Aviation Act 1990 requires the Authority to ensure that aeronautical information is readily available to any person upon the payment of a reasonable charge that is fixed by the Authority.

The AIP Service organisation is therefore required to make the information available to any person that pays any charge that may apply to the supply of the information. Details of the charge are not part of the rule requirements but are covered in a separate agreement between the CAA and the certificated organisation.

(b)(3) AIPNZ and AIC distribution. An effective and reliable distribution system for the aeronautical information published by a certificated organisation is an essential element of an effective aeronautical information service. Users of the information must be assured of receiving the information promptly. Chapter 7 of ICAO Doc 8126 provides guidance material on the distribution of aeronautical information.

(b)(4) Aeronautical charts. The general specifications and individual requirements and specifications of the various charts that form part of the AIPNZ and other aeronautical charts are contained in ICAO Annex 4. The ICAO Aeronautical Chart Manual (Doc 8697) also provides guidance material for the format and production of aeronautical charts.

(b)(5) Coordination of input information . The AIP Service organisation is required to coordinate the input of all aeronautical information from originators except—

(i) information that is of immediate operational significance necessitating the immediate issue of a NOTAM; and

(ii) temporary information of a duration of less than 3 months and only requires the issue of a NOTAM.

All information that requires the publication of an AIP Amendment or an AIP Supplement or a change to an aeronautical chart is to be forwarded to the AIP Service.

175.105 NOTAM Service

NOTAM service . The NOTAM Service is an essential element of any State aeronautical information service. It supplements the AIP Service and provides a fast medium for notifying aeronautical information whenever it is necessary to give due warning of any change or occurrence at short notice. The historical value of a NOTAM is minimal and therefore records of NOTAM need only be kept for 30 days unless required for an accident or incident investigation.

Requirement for NOTAM . Annex 15 requires a NOTAM to be originated and issued promptly whenever it is necessary to notify operationally significant information that is of a temporary nature and of short duration or when operationally significant permanent changes or temporary changes of long duration are made at short notice.

The organisation’s procedures required under rule 175.59 for the collection of information, therefore need to ensure that there are direct channels of communication for originators to submit the raw information. The procedures also need to ensure that the inputted raw information is properly verified and further information on this requirement is covered under section 175.59 in this AC concerning the collection of information.

The NOTAM Service organisation’s procedures required under rule 175.61 must ensure that a NOTAM is issued promptly whenever information that requires the issue of a NOTAM is received from a verified source. There may be occasions when unverified information, concerning an immediate hazard to air navigation, is received. In such cases, the NOTAM Office would be obliged to issue a NOTAM but would need to take follow up action to have an appropriate person verify the information.

Appendix 3 of this AC lists the information that needs to be promulgated by NOTAM.

The NOTAM Service organisation’s procedures also need to ensure that NOTAM are not used to promulgate information that is not of direct operational significance. Appendix 3 also lists the type of information that should not be promulgated by means of a NOTAM.

175.107 Pre-flight Information Service

The nature of the information provided by a pre-flight information service will depend on how the service is delivered. A pre-flight information service established on an aerodrome can provide physical displays of pre-flight information and facilities for face to face briefing or self briefing. Centralised pre-flight services are generally more automated and rely on telecommunications to convey the information to the recipient. These centralised services rely on the aircraft operator having the appropriate aeronautical charts and other published information.

Guidance information on pre-flight information services is given under section 175.55 of this AC and also in ICAO Doc 8126.

The provisions made by a pre-flight information service organisation for flight crew members to report post-flight information, as required under rule 175.107(c), will depend on the nature of the service provided. A pre-flight information service located on an aerodrome can provide facilities for flight crew to physically file their post-flight reports. A centrally located automated pre-flight information service could provide a free telephone number for flight-crew to call and file their post-flight reports.

175.109 Changes to Certificate Holder’s Organisation

The organisation exposition is intended to be a living document to reflect the organisation’s activities and its means to carry out those activities. Therefore, as the organisation’s activities, operating practices and procedures, standards, and services change, the exposition must be changed accordingly. The CAA must be kept informed of these changes and therefore a copy of each amendment to the exposition must be forwarded to the Director.

Any change to the organisation’s operating practices, procedures or standards that may affect the provision of adequate, accurate and timely aeronautical information need to be properly documented with background information and reasons for the change. The documented background information and reasons should be retained in the organisation’s records for possible audit trail purposes.

Rule 175.109(d) describes the changes to the exposition that require the prior approval of the Director. Senior personnel are included in this requirement because they must meet the criteria for a fit and proper person. Any change to the services provided would require a change to the certificate. As the CAA remains responsible for the aeronautical information published, any change to the format and standards for published aeronautical information needs to have the prior acceptance of the Director. The Director may also prescribe conditions that may be necessary because of a change in these items. The conditions may be transitional to allow the organisation to continue to operate while arrangements are made to incorporate permanent changes.


Appendix 1 — Aeronautical Information Publication New Zealand (AIPNZ)

Contents of AIPNZ

Aeronautical Information Publications (AIPs) are intended to satisfy requirements for the publication of aeronautical information of a lasting character essential to the safety of air navigation.

The AIPNZ are required to contain current information, data, and aeronautical charts relating to—

· the regulatory and airspace requirements for air navigation in the New Zealand FIR and in the areas of the Auckland Oceanic FIR in which New Zealand is responsible for air traffic services; and

· the New Zealand communications, navigation, meteorological and air traf­fic services and facilities that support international air navigation to and from New Zealand;

· the communications, navigation, meteorological and air traffic services and facilities that support air navigation within the New Zealand FIR; and

· the aerodromes that are operating under an aerodrome operating certificate issued under Civil Aviation Rule Part 139; and

· the regulatory requirements, services and facilities such as Customs, Immigration and Health associated with the facilitation of international passengers and goods to and from New Zealand.

Aeronautical charts are an integral part of the AIPNZ. Where applicable to the aerodromes published in the AIPNZ, the following charts should be published as part of the AIPNZ—

· Aerodrome/Heliport Chart—ICAO for all aerodromes

· Aerodrome ground Movement Chart—ICAO for all international aerodromes and for others where necessary due to congestion of information

· Aerodrome Obstacle Chart—ICAO Type A for all aerodromes certificated under Part 139

· Aircraft Parking/Docking Chart—ICAO where necessary due to complexity of terminal facilities

· Area Chart—ICAO where necessary due to complexity of air traffic services routes and position reporting requirements

· Instrument Approach Chart—ICAO for all aerodromes with instrument approach procedures

· Precision Approach Terrain Chart—ICAO for precision approach runways Categories II and III

· Standard Arrival Chart—Instrument (STAR)—ICAO where a standard instrument arrival route has been established and cannot be shown clearly on the Area Chart

· Standard Departure Chart—Instrument (SID)—ICAO where a standard instrument departure route has been established and cannot be shown clearly on the Area Chart

· Visual Approach Chart—ICAO where visual approach procedures have been established.

The Enroute Chart—ICAO should also be published as part of the AIPNZ associated with IFR operations.

All aeronautical charts should comply with the relevant standards in ICAO Annex 4, Aeronautical Charts. ICAO Doc 8697, Aeronautical Charts, provides further guidance information.

Publication of information on non-certificated aerodromes

The publications may also contain current information, data and charts for aerodromes not operating under an aerodrome operating certificate provided the aerodrome operator provides the AIP Service and the NOTAM Service with—

· the aerodrome operator’s name, address, telephone and facsimile numbers as applicable for publication in the AIPNZ; and

· the name and location indicator for the aerodrome; and

· a statement regarding the availability of the aerodrome, for example Public use, meaning available for general use without the prior agreement of the aerodrome operator, or Private use meaning available only with the prior agreement of the aerodrome operator; and

· a declaration that the person named in paragraph (5) has the capability and will undertake the responsibilities detailed in paragraphs (5)(i) to (5)(vi); and

· the name and contact details, for publication in the AIPNZ, of the person who will be responsible for—

· establishing any operational conditions or limitations on the use of the aerodrome that arise from the aerodrome design or the facilities or services provided at the aerodrome; and

· notifying the AIP Service of the aerodrome data and information that is required for publication in the AIPNZ. (Civil Aviation Advisory Circular AC 139-9, Notification of aerodrome data and information, sets out the data and information that is required for publication); and

· notifying the AIP Service of any permanent, or temporary long-term (greater than 3 months) change to the aerodrome data and information including any change to the operational data; and

· notifying the NOTAM office without delay of any condition or defect at their aerodrome that may affect the safe operation of aircraft and requires the issue of a NOTAM. (Appendix 3 of this AC details the conditions that require the issue of a NOTAM); and

· the accuracy and timeliness of the data and information forwarded to the AIP Service and to the NOTAM office for promulgation; and

· providing the AIP Service with an annual signed declaration that the aerodrome data and information published in the AIPNZ for their aerodrome is accurate.

All data and information forwarded to the AIP Service and to the NOTAM Office for promulgation must be accompanied by a declaration signed by the person named in paragraph (5). The declaration must state that the data and information is accurate.

The CAA may authorise the deletion of a non-certificated aerodrome from the AIPNZ if—

· the aerodrome operator or the person named in paragraph (5) fail to provide the AIP Service or the NOTAM Office with the required information, data and declarations; or

· the person named in paragraph (5) fails to notify—

· the AIP Service of any permanent or long-term temporary change to the aerodrome data and informa­tion; or

· the NOTAM Office of any signifi­cant change that should have been promulgated by NOTAM.


Appendix 2 — Aeronautical Information Circulars (AIC)

Requirement for an AIC

Aeronautical Information Circulars are issued whenever it is necessary to promulgate aeronautical information that does not qualify for—

· inclusion in the AIPNZ; or

· the issue of a NOTAM.

An AIC should be originated whenever it is desirable to promulgate—

· a long-term forecast of any major change in Legislation, Regulations, Rules, procedures or facilities:

· information of a purely explanatory nature liable to affect flight safety:

· information or notification of an explanatory or advisory nature concerning technical, legislative or purely administrative matters.

Information promulgated as an AIC

The information that should be promulgated as an AIC includes—

· forecasts of important changes in the air navigation procedures, services and facilities;

· forecasts of implementation of new navigation systems;

· significant information arising from aircraft accident or incident investigation that has a bearing on flight safety;

· information on Civil Aviation Rules relating to the safeguarding of international civil aviation against acts of unlawful interference;

· advice on medical matters of special interest to pilots;

· warnings to pilots concerning the avoidance of physical hazards;

· effect of certain weather phenomena on aircraft operations;

· information on new hazards affecting aircraft handling techniques;

· Rules relating to the carriage of restricted articles by air;

· reference to the requirements of, and publication of changes in, Civil Aviation Rules;

· aircrew licensing arrangements;

· training of aviation personnel;

· application of, or exemption from, Civil Aviation Rule requirements;

· advice on the use and maintenance of specific types of equipment;

· actual or planned availability of new or revised aeronautical charts;

· carriage of radio equipment;

· explanatory information relating to noise abatement;

· selected airworthiness directives;

· changes in NOTAM series or distribution, new editions of the AIPNZ or major changes on the contents, coverage or format; or

· other similar information.


Appendix 3 — NOTAM

Main Objectives

A NOTAM is required to be originated and issued promptly when—

· the information to be distributed is of a temporary nature and of short duration; or

· when operationally significant permanent changes, or temporary changes of long duration are made at short notice.

NOTAM are intended to supplement the AIPNZ. They serve as a fast medium for distributing information whenever it is necessary to give due warning of any change or occurrence, at short notice.

Information to be promulgated by NOTAM

NOTAM are published when it is necessary to distribute information of direct operational significance which—

· is of an ephemeral nature; or

· is appropriate to the AIPNZ but needs immediate distribution.

A NOTAM is required to be originated and issued promptly whenever any of the following information is of direct operational significance—

· the establishment, closure or a significant change in the operation of an aerodrome or runway that is published in the AIPNZ;

· the establishment, withdrawal or any significant change in the operation of aeronautical services such as aerodromes, aeronautical information services, air traffic services, communication services, meteorological services, search and rescue services;

· the establishment, withdrawal or change in the operation of electronic and other aids to air navigation and aerodromes. This includes any of the following conditions affecting any electronic aid to navigation or air-ground communication service—

· interruption or return to operation;

· change of frequency;

· change in notified hours of service;

· change of identification;

· change of orientation (directional aids);

· change of location;

· power increase or decrease amounting to 50 per cent or more;

· change in broadcast schedules or contents; or

· irregularity or unreliability of operation.

· the establishment, withdrawal or a significant change to a visual aid;

· the interruption of, or return to operation of, major components of an aerodrome lighting system;

· the establishment, withdrawal or a significant change to procedures for air navigation services;

· the occurrence or correction of major defects or impediments in a manoeuvring area;

· changes to and limitations on availability of fuel, oil and oxygen at international aerodromes;

· major changes to the availability of search and rescue facilities and services;

· the establishment, withdrawal or return to operation of hazard beacons marking significant obstacles to air navigation;

· any change in regulations or rules that require immediate action such as restricted areas for search and rescue action;

· presence of hazards not otherwise promulgated which affect air navigation (including obstacles, military exercises and operations, intentional and unintentional radio frequency interferences, rocket launches, displays, fireworks, sky lanterns, rocket debris, races and major parachuting events.);

· conflict zones which affect air navigation (to include information that is specific as possible regarding the nature and extent of threats of that conflict and its consequences for civil aviation);

· the erection, removal of or changes to significant obstacles to air navigation in the take-off/climb, approach, and missed approach areas, and runway strip;

· the establishment, discontinuance, activation or de-activation, or changes in the status of  restricted or danger areas;

· the establishment or discontinuance of areas or routes or portions of them where the possibility of interception exists and where the maintenance of guard on the VHF emergency frequency 121.5 MHz is required;

· the allocation, cancellation or change of location indicators;

· any change from the published category of rescue and fire fighting services available at an aerodrome. The change of category must be clearly stated;

· the presence, removal or significant change in hazardous conditions due to snow, slush, ice or water on the movement area of an aerodrome;

· any outbreaks of epidemics requiring  changes in the notified requirements for inoculations and quarantine measures;

· forecasts of solar cosmic radiation;

· the occurrence of pre-eruption volcanic activity, the location, date and time of volcanic eruptions and the existence, density and extent of volcanic ash cloud, including direction of movement, flight levels and routes or portions of routes that could be affected; or

· any other operationally significant circumstance.

Originators of NOTAM notifying the unserviceability of communication services, facilities and aids to air navigation should give a time at which restoration of the service or facility is expected. If the timing of the restoration is uncertain, an estimate of the time for restoration is to be given and the NOTAM must be issued with an expiry date-time group followed by EST. The originator of any NOTAM published with EST as part of the expiry date-time group must initiate a subsequent cancellation or replacement NOTAM. The NOTAM Office is also required, under rule 175.61(b)(7), to review any NOTAM issued without a defined expiry date to ensure that the originator takes the necessary follow up action.

Information not to be promulgated by NOTAM

Information that relates to an aerodrome or heliport and its vicinity and does not affect its operational status does not require the issue of a NOTAM. If the information is not of direct operational significance, it should be given local distribution during pre-flight briefing or other local contact with aircraft operators and pilots.

The following information is not to be notified by NOTAM—

· routine maintenance work on aprons and taxiways that does not affect the safe movement of aircraft;

· runway marking work, when aircraft operations can be safely conducted on other available runways, or the equipment used can be removed when necessary;

· temporary obstructions in the vicinity of aerodromes that do not affect the safe operation of aircraft;

· a partial failure of aerodrome lighting facilities where such failure does not directly affect aircraft operations;

· a partial temporary failure of air-ground communications when suitable alternative frequencies are available and are operative;

· the lack of apron marshalling facilities and road traffic control;

· the unserviceability of location, destination or other instruction signs on the aerodrome movement area;

· parachuting when in uncontrolled airspace under VFR, when controlled, at promulgated sites, or within danger or prohibited areas; and

· any other information of a similar temporary nature that does not affect the safe operation of aircraft.

NOTAM procedures and format

The safety of air navigation and the move to automated NOTAM services and databases requires standardised procedures and format to be used for NOTAM. This is particularly relevant to the “ B” series of NOTAM which receive international distribution. ICAO Annex 10 Volume II details the communications procedures to be followed for the transmission of information over the international aeronautical telecommunication service. ICAO Annex 15 details the ICAO format that all NOTAM should comply with, particularly the international NOTAM.

Further information regarding the publication of NOTAM is given in ICAO Doc 8126—AN/872 .