Published date: 18 February 2019

General

C ivil Aviation Authority advisory circular contains guidance and information about standards, practices, and procedures that the Director has found to be an acceptable means of compliance with the associated rules and legislation.

However, the information in the advisory circular does not replace the requirement for participants to comply with their obligations under the Civil Aviation Rules, the Civil Aviation Act 1990 and other legislation.

An advisory circular reflects the Director’s view on the rules and legislation. It expresses CAA policy on the relevant matter. It is not intended to be definitive. Consideration will be given to other methods of compliance that may be presented to the Director. When new standards, practices, or procedures are found to be acceptable, they will be added to the appropriate advisory circular. Should there be any inconsistency between this information and the rules or legislation, the rules and legislation take precedence.

An advisory circular may also include guidance material generally, including guidance on best practice as well as guidance to facilitate compliance with the rule requirements. However, guidance material must not be regarded as an acceptable means of compliance.

An advisory circular may also include technical information that is relevant to the rule standards or requirements.

Purpose

This material is intended for applicants for air traffic service personnel licences and ratings, holders of air traffic service personnel licences and ratings, air traffic services instructors, air traffic service examiners, training organisations, and air traffic service organisations.

Related Rules

This advisory circular relates specifically to Part 65 Air Traffic Service Personnel Licences and Ratings.

Change Notice

Revision 3 makes minor editorial updates to:

· issuing ATS ratings and validations

· instructor (CHK) and renewal of instructor (CHK) Appendix references.

Cancellation Notice

This advisory circular cancels AC65-9 Revision 2 dated 1 July 2016.

Version History

History Log

Revision No.

Effective Date

Summary of Changes

0

30 April 2001

This was the initial issue of this advisory circular.

1

03 May 2007

Revision 1 re-numbered this advisory circular from AC65-09 to AC65-9 as part of a project to standardise the numbering of all ACs.

2

01 July 2016

Revision 2 revised the syllabus of training for the instructor rating at Appendices A, B and C into a specific objective format.

3

18 February 2019

Revision 3 makes minor editorial updates to: issuing ATS ratings and validations; and instructor (CHK) and renewal of instructor Appendix references.

Changes to the advisory circular are as follows.

· Change Notice is updated.

· Can

· History log is inserted

· The numbering system is revised

· Paragraphs 2.2(b), 3.2, 3.2.2 and 3.3.1.1 are amended

· Paragraph 3.2.2.1 is inserted


1.    Introduction

1.1         Civil Aviation Rules, Part 65 prescribes rules governing the issue of air traffic service licences and ratings, the conditions under which those licences and ratings are necessary, and the privileges and limitations of those licences and ratings.

1.2         Part 65 introduced changes that included new area control automatic dependent surveillance ratings, instructor ratings, examiner ratings, and flight service operator licences.

1.3         This advisory circular and the associated series of advisory circulars have been produced to support the Part 65 - one for each Part 65 Subpart, and one for each rating where more than one rating is contained within a Subpart.


2.    Advisory Circular Intent and Process

2.1         This advisory circular provides guidance on how to comply with Part 65 Subpart I ‘Air Traffic Service Instructor Ratings’.

2.2         To provide clarity, the instructor is a person who is—

(a) instructing ATS personnel, and directly supervising ATS personnel under training, or regaining currency, who are performing ATS duties (Instructor – OJT [on the job trainer])

(b) assessing for, and issuing ATS ratings and validations in accordance with rule 65.405 (a)(3) (Instructor – CHK [Check]), are listed separately in this advisory circular.

2.3         CAA is actively managing the development of syllabi into specific objective formats. This format will specify exactly what has to be covered, and to what standard, so that no matter who studies, who instructs, and who assesses, all are working to exactly the same standards.


3.         Subpart I–Air Traffic Service Instructor Ratings

3.1         65.401          Applicability

3.1.1 Subpart I prescribes the rules governing the issuing of air traffic service instructor ratings and the privileges and limitations of those ratings.

3.2         65.403          Eligibility requirements

3.2.1      65.403.1        Instructor (OJT)

(a) Rule 65.403(a)(3) requires an applicant for an instructor rating to have satisfactorily completed a training course in the theory and practice of instruction. Successful completion of the syllabus give in Appendix A of this advisory circular would meet these requirements. Where a syllabus topic merits greater emphasis, this is indicated by an asterisk.

(b) Rule 65.403 (a)(4) requires an applicant for an instructor rating to have satisfactorily demonstrated the ability to exercise the privilege of the rating by passing an examination. Successful passing of an examination covering the syllabus in Appendix A of this advisory circular would meet these requirements. Where a syllabus topic merits greater emphasis, this is indicated by an asterisk.

(c) Rule 65.403 (a)(4) requires an applicant for an instructor rating to have satisfactorily demonstrated the ability to exercise the privilege of the rating by passing a practical test. Successful passing of a practical test covering the syllabus in Appendix A would meet these requirements. For the initial issue of an instructor rating it is acceptable that—

(1) the practical test may be conducted in a classroom, simulated or live environment

(2) an ATS examiner with appropriate education theory training conducts the practical test

(3) the evidence required to confirm that the candidate is also competent in the areas that the instructor rating will be exercise, may be confirmed by examining operational proficiency assessment reports.

3.2.2      65.403.2        Instructor (CHK)

3.2.2.1    The instructor (CHK) eligibility requirements include all those applicable to the instructor (OJT), as well as the following.

(a) Rule 65.403 (a)(3) requires an applicant for an instructor rating to have satisfactorily completed a training course in the theory and practice of instruction. Successful completion of the syllabi given in Appendices A and B of this advisory circular would meet this requirement. Where a syllabus topic merits greater emphasis, this is indicated by an asterisk.

(b) Rule 65.403 (a)(4) requires an applicant for an instructor rating to have satisfactorily demonstrated the ability to exercise the privilege of the rating by passing an examination and a practical test. Successful passing of an examination covering the syllabi in Appendices A and B of this advisory circular would meet this requirement. Where a syllabus topic merits greater emphasis, this is indicated by an asterisk.

(c) Rule 65.403 (a)(4) requires an applicant for an instructor rating to have satisfactorily demonstrated the ability to exercise the privilege of the rating by passing an examination and a practical test. Successful passing of a practical test covering the syllabi in Appendices A and B would meet this requirement. For the initial issue of an instructor rating [or initial upgrade from instructor (OJT) to instructor (CHK) if the training is split] it is acceptable that—

(1) the practical test may be conducted in a classroom, simulated or live environment

(2) an ATS Examiner with appropriate education theory training conducts the practical test

(3) the evidence required to confirm that the candidate is also competent in the areas that the instructor rating will be exercised, may be confirmed by examining operational proficiency reports.

3.3         65.405          Privileges and limitations

3.3.1      65.405.1        Renewal of instructor (CHK)

3.3.1.1    Rule 65.405 (b)(3)(ii) requires that the instructor (CHK) has demonstrated to the holder of an air traffic service examiner rating the ability to exercise the privileges by passing an examination and a practical test within the immediately preceding 13 months. For the renewal tests, following the structure given in Appendix B of this advisory circular would meet these requirements. It is acceptable for the test environment to be a classroom, simulated or live environment where the link between theory and practice (of examining for the particular rating) can be adequately demonstrated. Appendix C of this advisory circular provides additional guidance.

3.3.1.2    An instructor (CHK) may exercise the privileges of an instructor (OJT).


A1.       APPENDIX A

A1.1      Subject No 112 – Air Traffic Services Instructor Rating 

A1.1.1    Each subject has been given a subject number and each topic within that subject a topic number.  These reference numbers may be used on ‘knowledge deficiency reports’ and will provide valuable feed back to the examination candidate.

Section I – Instructor (OJT)

112.2

Learning

112.2.2

Describe the theory of how the brain is involved in learning.

112.2.4

Discuss Bloom’s Taxonomy of intellectual performance.

112.2.6

Describe the meaning and application of the recognised principles (laws) of learning.

112.2.8

Describe  barriers to effective learning and ways of overcoming these barriers, including:

(a) physical

(b) intellectual

(c) emotional

(d) administrative

112.2.10

Describe the theory of learning styles.

112.2.12

Describe how learning styles can be used to optimise learning.

112.2.14

Describe the characteristics of adult learners .

112.2.16

Describe techniques for motivating adult learners.

112.2.18

Describe the characteristics of an effective instructor in an adult on-job training situation.

112.2.20

Describe the effects of stress on learning.

112.2.22

Describe the stressors that can affect the learner and techniques an instructor can use to alleviate the problem.

112.2.24

Describe the communication styles used for ATS training including effect on the relationship between the instructor and the trainee.

112.2.26

Describe situations that can lead to conflict between the instructor and the trainee, including techniques to resolve conflict.

112.2.28

Describe the physical, cognitive & emotional symptoms of stress.

112.2.30

Describe the problem focused and emotion focused coping styles.

112.2.32

Describe strategies that can be used to limit and prevent stress.

112.4

ATS Training

112.4.2

Describe the roles and responsibilities of the following:

(a) Training Centre Manager

(b) Unit Training Specialist

(c) Unit Standards Specialist

(d) ATS Instructor (OJT)

(e) ATS Instructor (CHK)

(f) ATS Examiner

(g) CAA including Civil Aviation Act

(h) NZQA

(i) Service IQ

112.4.4

Describe the role of the National ATS Training documentation including information and guidance it contains relevant for the instructor.

112.4.6

Describe the stages and phases of ATS training including their rationale.

112.4.8

Describe the purpose of an individual training plan including training plan construction.

112.4.10

Describe the construction and use of curriculum and syllabus documents.

112.4.12

Describe assessment, moderation, feedback and intervention process followed by the ATS training organisation.

112.4.14

Describe the ATS organisation’s learning model.

112.4.16

Describe the construction of a one-on-one lesson.

112.4.18

Describe the construction of a series of on-job lessons used to meet the learning needs and styles of a trainee.

112.4.20

Describe an effective lesson, including but not limited to the:

(a) relevance of objectives to a lesson

(b) description and demonstration of effective questioning technique

112.4.22

Describe implementation of pre-session briefings and post-session de-briefings.

112.4.24

Describe training strategies appropriate to the ATS training environment in order that ATS training progress can be planned, made and measured.

112.4.26

Describe appropriate intervention strategies.

112.4.28

Describe training methodologies and strategies that can be utilised in ATS training.

112.4.30

Describe training tools that can be utilised in ATS training.

112.4.32

Describe support available for the new trainee, peripheral to the actual on-job training, that the instructor would normally be expected to provide.

112.6

Assessment and reporting processes

112.6.2

Describe an assessment including strategies for ensuring fair, consistent and reliable.

112.6.4

Describe an effective assessment, whether written oral or practical.

112.6.6

Describe the ATS training organisation documentation employed for ATS training.

112.6.8

Describe the instructor’s responsibilities in regard to consultation and completion of ATS training documentation.

112.6.10

Describe the means by which ATS training progress and achievement can be described in ATS training documentation.

112.8

Threat and error management

112.8.2

Describe threat management as it pertains to ATS training, including means of:

(a) recognising threats

(b) avoiding threats

(c) mitigating the effects of threats

Section II – Instructor Check (CHK)

112.10

Instructor check responsibilities

112.10.2

Describe the instructor check privileges and responsibilities.

112.10.4

Describe the functions and relationships of CAA Part 172/Part 141 certificate holders.

112.10.6

Describe the requirements for completing assessment documentation.

112.12

Assessment principles

112.12.2

Describe in general terms assessment principles including the purpose of assessment types.

112.12.4

Describe the purpose of a written assessment.

112.12.6

Describe the purpose of an oral assessment.

112.12.8

Demonstrate an effective oral assessment.

112.12.10

Describe the purpose of a practical assessment.

112.12.12

Demonstrate an effective practical assessment.

112.12.14

Describe the advantages and disadvantages of written, oral, and practical assessments.

112.12.16

Demonstrate the advantages and disadvantages of oral and practical assessments.

112.12.18

Describe the development of written, oral, and practical assessment tools.

112.12.20

Demonstrate the development of oral and practical assessment tools.

112.12.22

Describe the effective conduct of a written, oral, and practical assessment.

112.12.24

Demonstrate the effective conduct of an oral and practical assessment.

112.12.26

Describe constructive feedback.

112.12.28

Describe and demonstrate completion of assessment documentation.

112.12.30

Describe technique for the reduction of stress during the assessment process.

112.12.32

Describe moderation of assessment materials.

A2.       APPENDIX B

A2.1      Renewal Instructor (CHK)

A2.1.1    For the renewal (or initial issue) tests, following the structure given in Appendix C of this advisory circular would meet the requirements of Rule 65.405 (b)(3)(ii).

INSTRUCTOR (CHK)

PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT

Candidate Name:             Sector:

Examiner:                         Unit:

Assessment Conducted:

(Observation of final assessment, assessment, Training Check – Actual, Simulated)

Assessment Date:             Duration of Observation:

COMPETENT        NOT COMPETENT

Examiner Comments:

Examiner Signature:             Licence Number:

Candidate Comments:

Candidate Signature:

NT – Not tested.

NA – Not applicable

The candidate may have access to appropriate reference material during this assessment.

Elements of Competence (EC) and Performance Criteria (PC)

EC. A general knowledge of the principles of Assessment and Moderation are demonstrated.

PC       The purpose and principles of various types of assessment are explained

Yes / No

NT/ NA

What is the purpose of an Assessment?

Where do you find the performance criteria?

What do the following assessment principles mean?

Validity, Adequacy, Reliability, Efficiency, Feedback.

Remarks:

PC       Know the purpose of oral, written and practical assessments.

PC       The advantages and disadvantages of the different types of assessment are explained.

Yes / No

NT / NA

What is the purpose of a knowledge assessment?

What are the advantages of written over oral knowledge assessments?

What are the advantages of oral over written knowledge assessments?

What are the advantages and disadvantages of knowledge assessments?

What is the purpose of a practical assessment?

What are the advantages and disadvantages of practical assessments?

Remarks:


PC       Demonstrate knowledge of the purpose and process of moderation.

Yes / No

NT / NA

What is the purpose of moderation of an assessment?

How are assessments moderated?

Where do you find the moderation process for an assessment?

What are the roles of an Agent/Moderator/Arbitrator in assessments?

Remarks:

EC. Able to assess staff for the issue of ATS ratings, certificates of competency and validations.

PC       A good working knowledge in preparing and conducting written and oral examinations, in accordance with the training procedures, Operational procedures and CAA Rules, is demonstrated.

Yes / No

NT / NA

Know how to prepare questions and model answers for knowledge test.

Know the principles of briefing and debriefing for knowledge tests.

Know how to record the answers to questions in knowledge tests.

Remarks:

PC       A good working knowledge in preparing and conducting practical examinations, in accordance with the training procedures, operational procedures and CAA Rules, is demonstrated.

Yes / No

NT / NA

Know how to prepare for a practical assessment.

Demonstrates knowledge of the required performance criteria.

Know the principles of briefing and debriefing for a practical assessment.

Know how to assess practical skills against the performance criteria.

Remarks:

PC       A good working level skill in conducting written, oral and practical assessments in accordance with the training procedures, operational procedures and CAA Rules, is demonstrated.

Yes / No

NT / NA

Demonstrates the ability to conduct knowledge exams.

Demonstrates the ability to conduct practical exams.

The ability to record the significant activities occurring during an assessment is demonstrated.

Completion of the appropriate assessment forms is demonstrated.

Remarks:


PC       A good working knowledge of how to reduce stress before and during an assessment is demonstrated.

Yes / No

NT / NA

Is aware of how stress can affect the performance of the candidate.

Knows how to reduce stress in the candidate before and during knowledge and practical assessments.

Remarks:

EC. Complete the administration requirements for the issue of ATS ratings, and validations.

PC       A mastery knowledge of how to complete assessment and licensing documentation as required by operational procedures, training procedures and CAA Rules is demonstrated.

Yes / No

NT / NA

Demonstrate how to complete the relevant logbook entries.

Know which forms contained in operational procedures and training procedures are required to be completed for the relevant qualifications.

Demonstrate how to complete the relevant forms contained in operational procedures and the training procedures.

Know how to complete the Qualification Administration processes contained in operational procedures is demonstrated.

Remarks:


EC. Describe the privileges and responsibilities of an ATS instructor (CHK)

PC       A mastery knowledge of the of the privileges and responsibilities of an ATS instructor (CHK) as prescribed in CAA Rule Part 65, operational procedures and the training procedures is demonstrated.

Yes / No

NT / NA

Know the privileges of the ATS instructor (CHK) qualification as it applies to this candidate.

Know the minimum qualifications required for an instructor (CHK) to be able to issue ratings, and validations.

Remarks:


A3.       APPENDIX C

A3.1      Assessment Technique Guidance Material

A3.1.1    The following is provided as additional guidance for ATS Examiners assessing for instructor CHK ratings.

ASSESSMENT CHECKLIST

The following Checklist contains items that the Examiner will look for during the instructor (CHK)’s assessment of the controller/flight service operator.

Instructor (CHK)’s Preparation

Things that the instructor (CHK) could/should do before the controller/flight service operator assessment.

q Familiarised him/herself with the assessment documentation and procedures as required by operational procedures (e.g. a Manual of Air Traffic Services), training procedures (e.g. Training Plans) and unit procedures (e.g. Local Unit Orders).

q Previously checked the controller/flight service operator’s Training File – Was the previous Assessment busy or light traffic, runway in use, deficiencies noted.

q Obtaining information from other sources as to the controller/flight service operator’s abilities

q Advise others that may be affected by the assessment that it is going to take place and any special requirements that you may have of them.

q Ready to commence assessment on time

q Correct forms at hand

The Pre-brief  

Things that the instructor (CHK) could/should cover during the briefing of the controller/flight service operator

q Pre-brief conducted in an appropriate environment

q Purpose/Type of assessment explained

q Anything special that will be expected of the controller/flight service operator during the assessment is explained

q Advice that a phraseology check will be made

q Stress reduction techniques used

q Advising that there will be note-taking – positive areas and areas identified as improvement opportunities

q Show the controller/flight service operator the assessment form

q Normal rostered breaks taken – variations

q How long the assessment will be – sufficient time to gain sufficient evidence of competency

q Emphasis on safety rather than expedition explained

q Controller/flight service operator asking questions during the assessment

q Is the controller/flight service operator ready for the assessment

q Any special needs

Controller/flight service operator self-briefing (NOTAM etc)

q Did the instructor (CHK) observe the controller/flight service operator/flight service operator’s self-brief

q Did the instructor (CHK) do a self-brief?

Hand-over

q Observation of the controller/flight service operator taking-over watch

q Did the instructor (CHK) understand the traffic situation and other significant information

q Comments noted about the hand-over

Observation of the controlling/flight service

q Suitably positioned to accurately and fully observe the controller/flight service operator’s performance

q Suitably positioned to adequately monitor the traffic situation and take-over if required (during assessment etc)

q Headset on at all times

q Watching the controller/flight service operator’s performance at all times

q Instructor (CHK)’s reactions to distractions – assessment not degraded by distractions

Note-taking

q Adequate note-taking throughout the assessment

q All notable events recorded during the assessment

q Recording of phraseology check – noting any incorrect phraseologies used

Interaction instructor (CHK)/controller/flight service operator

q Not interfering with controller/flight service operator’s performance

q Not asking questions at inappropriate times

q Pertinent questions asked at appropriate times

q Provided a non-threatening environment and supportive atmosphere

q Communicated clearly with the candidate

Stress reduction techniques

q Appropriate techniques used throughout assessment

q Seating position – suitable to observe but without adding stress/interfering with controller/flight service operator

q Manner of speech/relaxed tone of voice used

q Helping controller/flight service operator where appropriate

De-brief

q De-brief conducted in an appropriate environment

q Immediate indication of the controller/flight service operator’s performance

q Opportunity given for progressive de-briefs (during breaks)

q Discussion about points recorded in assessment form

q Listening to and trying to understand controller/flight service operator’s point of view

q Advice/educative comments made

q Comments are clear and to the point

q Opportunity given for discussion and/or questions by the controller/flight service operator regarding any aspects of controlling/flight service

Report writing

q Accurate record of events

q All significant errors recorded along with comments on good performance

q Legible writing

q Understandable

q Constructive and positive phrasing of report

q Written evidence that substantiates Pass/Fail

q Primary comments are a summary of report

q ‘Theory’ questions and answers (correct and given) written on report

q Opportunity given for controller/flight service operator to read and analyse written comments and write own comments in their own time

Documentation

q Report correctly filled out – all appropriate sections completed

q All other applicable forms/reports actioned (Skills/Knowledge Checklist, Ready for assessment form, etc)

q Report signed by assessor and controller/flight service operator

q Report and applicable forms forwarded to correct place

q Log Book correctly signed

Assessment techniques

q Assessment was valid in that it assessed what it set out to assess

q Assessment was adequate in that that sufficient evidence was obtained

q Assessment was reliable in that it followed commonly used techniques and is likely to produce same results on different occasions.

q Assessment was efficient – avoiding unnecessary duplication and length – resources not wasted

q Assessment provided feedback to candidate.

General

q Assessment carried out in accordance with applicable procedures and rules – assessor familiar with procedures. (i.e. acceptable knowledge of training procedures)

q Instructor (CHK)’s ‘controller/flight service operator’ knowledge acceptable (i.e. acceptable knowledge of operational procedures – air traffic control separation standards, flight information standards)

q Instructor (CHK)’s Logbook up-to-date