• the proposed operation meets the requirements of the local authority Regional Air Plans.

  • the pilot is appropriately licensed, and meets the operational currency requirements for each proposed operation.

  • the weather is suitable to conduct each intended operation.

  • the pilot and ground crew are fit and well, have had ample rest and are not fatigued.

  • the crew have ample healthy food and water to last each operation.

  • all crew have planned for ample rest and break periods throughout each operation.

  • the pilot and ground crew have discussed:
    1. each planned operation for the day.
    2. how they intend caring for each other, and keeping an eye out for each other.
    3. how they intend communicating with each other, especially with regard to fuel management and the timing of refuels.

  • mobile phones and VHF portable radio equipment are fully charged and operable.

  • the pilot and/or ground crew have accessed the company airstrip/loading area/job hazard register applicable to the job to familiarise themselves with known hazards, and have discussed these with the farmer.

  • If a new client or airstrip / loading site that hasn’t been used before, a ground reconnaissance / survey of the facility and treatment areas is recommended before arrival or accepting the task.

  • these areas are in good repair and safe to use (eg, access tracks are safe and in good condition, airstrip / loading sites have no long grass or obstacles, and the take-off paths are clear), and there has been a discussion with the farmer about this, if needed.

  • the pilot and ground crew have been thoroughly briefed and are familiar with emergency response plans and associated procedures.

  • the operations base (chief pilot or person responsible for flight following) has been informed of the intended daily programme.

  • the Chief pilot and flight follower is immediately notified of any changes to the planned daily activities.

  • all operational notifications have been completed for each job as applicable.

  • the pilot has carried out a thorough preflight inspection of the aircraft and all role equipment to be used.

  • the ground crew/loading vehicle is appropriately equipped with operational equipment including emergency response plan and equipment as appropriate, e.g., an approved fuel/chemical spill kit, fire extinguisher, axe and first aid kit, operational health and safety

  • area signage, and clean water and soap for crew hand washing etc.

  • the loading vehicle is roadworthy, fully compliant and has ample fuel for both vehicle and aircraft as appropriate for each intended operation.

  • the ground crew erects a health and safety operational area sign at the entrance to the loading site/airstrip.

  • Ground crew strategically erect windsocks.

  • only personnel authorised by the ground crew operational area controller are present on the loading areas.

  • those personnel have been fully briefed on all associated hazards prior to entering the work area, and are being kept under constant surveillance.

  • Loading site / airstrip are livestock free and any dogs are tied up and are not wandering free on the site.

  • the pilot and ground crew have discussed the operation including all known operational hazards with the farmer and document that discussion – having the farmer sign appropriate documentation showing acceptance that the loading site/airstrip is safe to use and

  • all required information has been passed on to the crew, and it is understood.

  • the pilot has undertaken a risk assessment/reconnaissance flight with the farmer if required of the treatment area, loading site / airstrip, and turn-around areas, before dispensing products, to identify/confirm hazards, eg, wires and obstacles, and determine how the job can be done safely and economically.

  • a reconnaissance survey conducted from the ground has been completed if considered appropriate.

  • the pilot has conducted a risk assessment of the loading area/airstrip conditions,  which includes the climb out areas and checked products to be dispensed for quality and correctness.

  • an assessment is carried out of the prevailing weather conditions, eg, wind, temperature and pressure (density altitude) to determine safe loads to be carried.

  • the pilot has taken into account, the position/angle of the sun (visibility, glare and shadows) in regards to take-off, landing, and treatment areas.

  • the pilot has made sure the aircraft is loaded properly, ie, helicopters are operated safely within MCTOW, and aeroplanes are operated safely within Appendix B MAUW limits.
  • the ground crew erects a health and safety operational area sign at the entrance to the loading site/airstrip.

  • ground crew strategically erect windsocks.

  • only personnel authorised by the ground crew operational area controller are present on the loading areas.

  • those personnel have been fully briefed on all associated hazards prior to entering the work area, and are being kept under constant surveillance.

  • Loading site / airstrip are livestock free and any dogs are tied up and are not wandering free on the site.

  • the pilot and ground crew have discussed the operation including all known operational hazards with the farmer and document that discussion – having the farmer sign appropriate documentation showing acceptance that the loading site/airstrip is safe to use and
    all required information has been passed on to the crew, and it is understood.

  • the pilot has undertaken a risk assessment/reconnaissance flight with the farmer if required of the treatment area, loading site / airstrip, and turn-around areas, before dispensing products, to identify/confirm hazards, eg, wires and obstacles, and determine how the job can be done safely and economically.

  • a reconnaissance survey conducted from the ground has been completed if considered appropriate.

  • the pilot has conducted a risk assessment of the loading area/airstrip conditions,  which includes the climb out areas and checked products to be dispensed for quality and correctness.

  • an assessment is carried out of the prevailing weather conditions, eg, wind, temperature and pressure (density altitude) to determine safe loads to be carried.

  • the pilot has taken into account, the position/angle of the sun (visibility, glare and shadows) in regards to take-off, landing, and treatment areas.

  • the pilot has made sure the aircraft is loaded properly, ie, helicopters are operated safely within MCTOW, and aeroplanes are operated safely within Appendix B MAUW limits.
  • all crew must have their planned rest and break periods.

  • the pilot and ground crew should be in VHF contact at all times.

  • refuelling must be conducted in accordance with any aircraft flight manual and/or company standing operating procedures.

  • ground crew are to ensure the aircraft is securely bonded before refuelling and ensure the fuel is free of water and any other contaminants.

  • only people performing an essential function with the flight are to be carried on the aircraft. Despite this, no passengers are to be carried on flights when dispensing products, ie, topdressing, spraying or VTA operations.

  • the pilot must ensure each agricultural operation is performed without hazard to people or property on the ground, and the aircraft is not flown at a height lower than that required for the purpose of the flight.

  • the weather conditions must be continually monitored.
  • the loading  sites should be left clean and tidy – ie chemical containers triple rinsed and removed by the farmer or ground crew – and fertiliser covers should be folded and neatly placed on the side of the loading area.

  • the pilot should debrief the farmer as applicable. If the farmer is not present when the job is finished, they should be contacted that evening. Any new hazards identified must be passed on to the farmer.

  • the operations base and/or chief pilot must be notified of any new hazards or changes to existing hazards, and the applicable company hazard register is updated accordingly.